Frame Dance’s Annual Music Competition

Frame Dance and Composers Tuesday Tunes

It’s back!

Frame Dance Music Composition Competition

Photo by Sil Azavedo
Photo by Sil Azavedo

We’re calling all composers to submit to our annual music competition, for a chance to find a collaborator for one of our  live dances, and/or one of our dance films. We’ll be using the winner’s music in one of our pieces for the Spring season.

We do not accept works previously licensed to third-party publishing companies.  This requirement, of course, does not limit works that are self-published where the composer has not entered into a licensing relationship with a third party.blanton_musicians

The entry fee is $15.00. Composers may submit one, two, or three pieces.

Submission Guidelines
Works may be written for solo, duet, trio, quartet, or quintet.
Acoustic works that utilize electronic playback are also acceptable.
Electronic music is accepted and encouraged.

Deadline is January 9, 2015

Winner will be announced January 30, 2015 

Submit here.

 

 

Past Winners:music2

2014

First Place

Robert Honstein

an index of possibility, for percussion trio

 

 

Second Place

Matthew Peterson

Rain Dances, for quadrophonic mixed media

 

Third Placemusic3

Jonathan Russell

Five Two Tango, for two violins

 

Film Score Winner*

D. Edward Davis

cliff nesting, for alto saxophone with the sounds of Black-legged Kittiwakes near Seward, Alaska

*Frame Dance is currently in production for an upcoming film, and has selected cliff nesting, as the musical score for the film

 

Shannon Adams2013 Winner

Robert McClure

2012 Winner

musicc

Charles Halka

2011 Winner

Micah Clark

 

 

 

image David DeHoyos
image David DeHoyos

 

 

Good Luck! We look forward to presenting your music!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You’re so brave

MFA Mondays

It started when I wanted to see what came up on Google if I typed in “MFA dance programs.”  What came up was a list of what are possibly the largest and most well known MFA MFA right
programs– and those with their SEO figured out.  I sat there staring at the first hit, and then scrolled down wondering which school I should click on first.  I clicked, and apparently unclicked my self-confidence.  (Could they see me through the screen?  Were they laughing at my ignorant query into their top tier elite institution?) That suffocating, diminishing blanket that hovers and squeezes you whenever you walk into an audition came right back over me. I thought I had grown larger than that blanket, but apparently I’ve just felt mostly comfortable for some time.  I hadn’t felt that vulnerable exposition in a while.

That little anecdote is really leading to two things:

1) Applying for programs is scary.  You are brave.  Auditioning is scary. You are brave.  Interviewing is scary. You are brave.  Doing things where you put everything on the table– where you go all in– and might not get anything back is terrifying.  I’ve known some people to LIVE on that feeling.  I, however, want to shrink into the smallest version of myself.  I’ve always wanted more courage because that shrinking feeling is the absolute worst.  If you’re a shrinker like me, practice putting yourself in places that are scary.  People tell you to “fake it til you make it” but I can’t think of too many things more miserable than wearing a false self.  So I try to go back to the place where I do feel confident, where I feel like I am my full self, and pull of those things into the new, scary place.  It takes some discipline to not let the fears run rampant.

2) Let’s do something that pushes us out of our comfort zones this year.  I mean really, actually pushes you.  I think we all take some small and fairly safe risks.  But it takes courage and motivation to really push yourself.  And maybe it’s only one thing this whole year.  And I want to know what it is.  Share, because you will inspire someone.

 

 

Performances/Screenings

Today we were listed in Arts + Culture’s 16 Standouts of the Fall 2014 for Truck Dances at the Dance Source Houston’s 10th Anniversary Party and DiverseWorks’s Fashion Fete.  We are honored and thrilled!  I was a choreographer on the Afoot! project with Forklift Danceworks and Houston Arts Alliance. Afoot! was the big marching band project in the East End earlier this year.  What a full Fall we had!  We also performed in Austin with the Baylor Percussion Ensemble and composer Robert Honstein as well as at the Brazos Contemporary Dance Festival at A&M University. Not to mention METRODances on the light rail. I need a breather!  Photos by Jonathon Hance, Charles Halka, Lorie Evans, Lydia Hance.

 

 

Tasty Thursdays

Blog Holidays Tasty Thursdays

 

Whether you are having a Christmas Party, impressing the in-laws, planning a romantic dinner or simply looking for a fun place to dine with your closest friends, Houston has a wide selection of amazing restaurants perfect for your special occasion!

 

Don’t forget to make a reservation!

 

024 Grille 

 

A modern twist on classic American cuisine. Our culinary team crafts a unique menu, with an emphasis on local, seasonal fare, including Texas prime steaks and seafood from the Gulf. Located in the prestigious 024 zip code and in the heart of the Memorial City District, adjacent to the thriving Energy Corridor, 024 Grille additionally offers four intimate private dining rooms, a sophisticated wine list and a signature cocktail menu.

(Check out their Holiday Menu!)

 

Buca di Beppo

 

Buca Di Beppo is the Perfect Party Venue for all Your Special Occasions. When it comes to celebrations, Buca is known as party central! Our hearty Italian dishes are served family-style, making them perfect for sharing. Plus, the eclectic décor, lively music and engaging staff, all add to the fun. From a communion, anniversary and holiday party to a prom dinner, military event and retirement banquet, throwing a great party is what Buca does best!

 

Eddie V’s

 

Seafood is what we’re known for, but our specialty is excellence. Fish arrive daily from pristine waters around the world including Swordfish from Block Island, Scallops from Georges Banks, and Yellow Fin Tuna from the Caribbean. USDA Prime steaks are hand cut and specially aged for over 28 days to ensure peak flavor. Devotion to excellence is the guiding principal in all that we do. From making fresh tortillas by hand daily for our lobster tacos to including a full half pound of Jumbo Lump crab meat in our crab cakes, we strive to go above and beyond in every step of preparation.

 

Fleming’s

 

Founded in 1998 by restaurateurs Paul Fleming and Bill Allen, the first Fleming’s opened in Newport Beach, California. The vision was to create a unique steakhouse experience with an emphasis on generous hospitality, an inviting atmosphere and the very finest aged USDA Prime beef.

In addition to inspired service and expertly prepared Prime Steak, our founders focused on an exceptional selection of wines for Guests to explore. The Fleming’s 100® — our award-winning collection of 100 wines by the glass — was born.

 

Seasons 52

 

Seasons 52 is a fresh grill and wine bar that provides our guests with a fresh dining experience. Our restaurant offers a seasonally inspired menu, an award-winning international wine list, knowledgeable and approachable service and a casually sophisticated ambiance that feels comfortable and inviting.

 

Wellness Wednesday: The Holidays!

Blog Eat Well Wednesday Holidays

Merry Christmas and Happy Hanukkah!

Here are some fun recipes to help you get ready for the holidays!

 

8 Hanukkah Recipes For A Happy, Healthy Celebration

http://www.blisstree.com/2012/12/08/food/happy-healthy-hanukkah-recipes-celebrations-food/

Traditional Hanukkah recipes - dessert doughnuts

 

Looking for fun and quick dishes to make for that upcoming Christmas party or family gathering?

Check out this amazing site full of appetizers, cocktails, desserts and more!

 

http://www.freefunchristmas.com/christmas-recipes/

 


 

 

 

Wellness Wednesday: cook with me tonight

Eat Well Wednesday

0Hi Framers,

I have recently rediscovered the crock pot meal (after a wonderful reminder from #FrameMom.)  So both Monday and Tuesday, I’ve made different slow cooker dishes, and tonight I will try a third.  Will you join me?

Monday, I made orange glazed turkey meatballs. The recipe calls for regular, beef meatballs, but I wanted to try something a little lower in fat and still high in protein.  The recipe I used is here.  They were pretty delicious, better than I thought.  I do think they are best for a buffet or appetizer.

Tuesday, I made a taco pulled chicken salad.  It called for taco shells or tostadas, but I broke up a few blue corn chips and put it on a bed of lettuce and made it a taco salad.  This was VERY good and I would recommend it.  I also made my own seasonings instead of buying the packets.  Made me feel a little bit healthier.  I am always a fan of knowing what exactly is in my food.  (control freak?)

Tonight, I plan to make Sesame Chicken and serve it over spinach.  I’ll be following this recipe.  Join me?  Ingredients: chicken breasts, salt and pepper, honey, soy sauce, onion, ketchup, olive oil, minced garlic, red pepper flakes, cornstarch, sesame seeds.

 

Tuesday Tunes

Tuesday Tunes

We’re getting really excited about this year’s Music Composition Competition. This is the fifth year! We’ve been beyond honored to work with not only ridiculously talented composers, but kind, funny, collaborative people.  Today was inspired by this, which makes me realize how important it is to be inspired by your collaborators, but also to have fun.  These are some fun promo videos we made for a show in 2013.

 

Talking to the composers about their music:

Ecouter: Another Afternoon with the Composers from Frame Dance Productions on Vimeo.

Composer silliness:

Ecouter: An Afternoon With The Composers from Frame Dance Productions on Vimeo.

Is the MFA the new MBA?

MFA Mondays

MFA right

“COMPANIES ALL ACROSS AMERICA ARE STARTING TO SEE A CRITICAL TALENT GAP AS OLDER EMPLOYEES RETIRE. ARTS STUDENTS MAY NOT HAVE ALL THE TRADITIONAL SKILLS, BUT THEY HAVE THE MOST IMPORTANT ONE: CREATIVITY.”

You may have seen this article floating around on social media.  Here are some key points, but I encourage you to read the full article!  What a perfect response to anyone who sees art as a hobby.  Use this article as a way to explain why the skills of an artist go beyond  the art form and are key to the growth of business in our time.  It’s always great to have language on hand when our value is questioned time and time again.

“Consider this: Today’s contingent economy has people moving constantly from one job to another, one type of work to another, one industry to a different industry. In fact, on average, a person between the ages of 25 and 45 will hold 11 different jobs in their lifetime. Thirty percent of us will work in more than 15 different jobs over the course of our careers.

Organizations far and wide—perhaps even yours—will compete intensely for workers who are adaptable, resourceful, and can quickly learn and apply new skills to a variety of challenges. Where can you find such workers?

One answer runs counter to much conventional wisdom: Ask an artist.”

“Is art school the next B-school? Hardly, though artists often possess the skills and temperament that business leaders regularly say are in short supply: creativity, resiliency, flexibility, high tolerance for risk and ambiguity, as well as the courage to fail.”

Ways to engage artists in the workplace:

  •  Ask them to explicitly think about puzzles using their artistic hat/lens. Invite a local theater group to work with employees on improvisation exercises to free up their creative juices. Research has shown that when people engage in improv they later generate more creative ideas to a range of issues and challenges.
  • Figure out how to incorporate critical feedback into an ongoing process of improvement and innovation. Ask an artist to come in and run a “critical feedback” workshop for employees.
  • Have an artist facilitate a workshop where a creative task is emergent, shifting, and where new information requires adjustments and negotiation.

“Many people see artists as shamans, dreamers, outsiders, and rebels. In reality, the artist is a builder, an engineer, a research analyst, a human relations expert, a project manager, a communications specialist, and a salesman. The artist is all of those and more—combined with the imagination of an inventor and the courage of an explorer. Not a bad set of talents for any business challenged to innovate in a world of volatility, uncertainty, and change.”

The full article, “Is an MFA and new MBA?” by Steven Tepper can be found here.