Free Events Thursdays

Free Events Thursday

Don’t have any plans for Halloween? Now you do!

 

Alamo Drafthouse Cinema Houston Presents Friday Night Fright

October 31, 2014 at 7:00 pm

114 Vintage Park Blvd, Houston, TX 77070

BEWARE: Halloween is near and Alamo Drafthouse Cinema Houston has a ghoulishly good surprise!

Alamo Drafthouse Cinemas Houston is showing Halloween horror classics at both its Houston-area theaters this Friday as part of its Friday Night Fright! Both Vintage Point and Mason Park theaters are inviting Houstonians to show up in their scariest ensembles.

While its encouraged everyone dresses up as characters from the frightening flicks being shown, any costume earns participants a FREE ticket to the Friday Night Fright movie! So start your costume shopping early and get ready to have a frightfully fun Friday night with Alamo Drafthouse Cinema!

Price: FREE!!!

 

Attack of the Bloodsuckers

September 20, 2014 – January 04, 2015 (Recurring daily) from  9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

1515 Hermann Drive, Houston, TX 77008

It’s the science of what’s eating you! Discover the biological wonders of creatures that eat blood through encounters with live species and interactive stations.

Price: $8

 

Boo on the Boardwalk

October 31, 2014

701 4th Street, Kemah, TX 77565

 

For the entire month of October, Kemah is hosting Boo on the Boardwalk where families can enjoy an array of Halloween themed activities. For the braver souls, face the dungeon of doom while the kids enjoy the Little Boo Haunted Fun house. Other attractions include pumpkin decorating, live entertainment and costume contests.

Price: Go to their website for more details. In other words, I don’t know. 

 

8th Annual Montrose Crawl

October 31, 2014 from 7pm to 2am

Houston’s biggest & best Halloween event returns for its 8th year! First get your costume on, then get your drink on as the Crawl hits 12 restaurants & bars between Dunlavy & Montrose on Westheimer, including Brasil, Poison Girl, Pistolero’s, Boondocks, Stone’s Throw, Etro Lounge, Catbirds, Royal Oak, Doc’s Motorworks, Slick Willie’s, El Real Tex-Mex, and Hay Merchant, with special appearances by Koagie Hots and The Golden Grill.

As always, there’ll be no covers & no tickets, plus drink specials all night long. And prizes will be awarded for the best outfits at each stop, with a grand costume prize awarded by this year’s honorary Grand Crawler.

Price: FREE!!!

 

8th Annual Bayou City Outdoors Haunted Hike & Pizza Party

October 31, 2014 from  6:30 PM to 9:30 PM

Memorial Park near the rugby/soccer field parking lot

Get your spooky with BCO as we hike and slither our way through Memorial Park with our closest pals on Halloween! We will nourish ourselves afterwards with pizza and beverages, for those who make it out of the forest. Tap into your inner wolf or go all vampy on us, or come as a traditional ghoul (or, hey, wear your office attire– that could be scary enough!) Leave the bars to the zombies and join us in the woods for some quality and creepy exercise and socializing at Memorial Park.

We meet at 6:30 and depart at 7 PM sharp from the rugby/soccer field parking lot (click for map) (For you chickens out there – just come to the after-party starting around 8 PM in the rugby/soccer field parking lot).

What to Bring: 

Don’t get left in the dark and don’t forget to wear walking shoes (it is a hike no matter how dead you are), a flashlight, bug spray, and a little money just in case. Open to members, guests and the public (we love fresh meat) – bring a friend or come alone, if you dare. You’ll be sure to find a devil or two to talk to. (Please no dogs at this hike).

RSVP at http://www.BayouCityOutdoors.com Additional info call 713-524-3567 or e-mail to Kelly@bayoucityoutdoors.com

Price: FREE!!!

 

Wellness Wednesdays

Eat Well Wednesday

If You Only Do 10 Yoga Poses, Do These

 http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-11941/if-you-only-do-10-yoga-poses-do-these.html

 

Broken Lady Finger Cookies

Broken Finger Cookies

 

Ingredients

¼ cup unsalted butter, softened

½ cup white sugar

1 egg

1 tsp vanilla

pinch salt

1 ¾ cup all-purpose flour

2 tsp baking powder

2 Tbsp milk

2 Tbsp red cake-decorating sugar

20 whole blanched almonds OR 20 pieces banana chips

 

Directions 

1. Preheat oven to 350ºF.

2. Line baking sheet with parchment paper.

3. In bowl, using electric mixer, beat butter until fluffy. Gradually beat in sugar. Beat until mixture is no longer “scratchy” sounding against bowl.

4. Beat in egg, vanilla and salt.

5. In separate bowl, mix together flour and baking powder (tip for measuring flour: stir flour, spoon into measuring cup, then level).

6. Gradually beat flour mixture into butter mixture.

7. Switch to working in flour mixture with hands when dough gets too stiff to beat.

8. Knead into smooth dough. Roll into 3/4-inch thick “ropes”. Break ropes into 3-inch sections. Pat one end smooth. Dip tip of other end of each piece into milk then red sugar.

9. Place on lined baking sheet. Pressing in sides of rope to prevent flattening, insert almond or piece of banana chip into rounded end. Repeat process to make 20 fingers.

10. Bake on middle rack of oven 17 minutes, or until dough is lightly golden.

Tuesday Tunes: Jacquelyne Jay Boe Profile

Tuesday Tunes

Frame Dancer Performer Profiles

Photo by Sil Azavedo
Photo by Sil Azevedo from CONTEXT.

Name: Jacquelyne Jay Boe

First Frame Piece: 

Mortar, Sylphs Wrote

photo by David DeHoyos from the Liminal Space/Frame Dance performance of Steve Reich's 2x5.
photo by David DeHoyos from the Liminal Space/Frame Dance performance of Steve Reich’s 2×5.

One thing you always do when preparing for a performance:

I run through the piece in my mind. 

What do you do after a performance?  

Jackie as "Gwen" in Dinner/Dance 19.
Jackie as “Gwen” in Dinner/Dance 19.

Relax 

How do you unwind?

A bath 

Favorite moment in performance: 

When my energy is calm and powerful. When everything I am doing feels easy, those are my favorite performances. With experience and frequency this happens more often then not. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MFA Monday

MFA Mondays

MFA rightSurprising things I discovered when entering Grad School

 

I would make friends.

I thought when I went back to school to get my MFA that I would be entering an uptight academic environment.  I was so preoccupied with the idea of school and relocating my life that I forgot I would be entering a community of like-minded peers. In undergrad, even among dance majors, I was considered the “dance nerd.”   In grad school I was surrounded by not only dancers but specifically  “dance nerds,” people who wanted to explore, dissect and reveal as much about the art as I did.  This community turned out to be a vital support group throughout the process of completing my degree.  Having others to bitch to, socialize, laugh, and share my fledgling art with became essential for my survival during this stressful time.  These bonds were not only a lifeline during the process but created many long lasting friendships and an excellent network that stands strong long after graduation.

 

The teacher/student relationship has evolved.

When you enter a graduate program you have already passed a test in the eyes of the faculty.  You have already completed one major academic step and have decided to continue onto another. There are fewer grad students for them to keep track of and you yourself are probably a much better student.  For me this reduced a lot of the intimidation I felt with my undergraduate professors.  While I had (and still have) great respect for the faculty who guided me through my MFA program I sensed a more open relationship with them than I had past teachers.  I believe this allowed me to ask for help in my learning process more readily and, in turn, gave me the most out of the program.

 

 

It’s not only about making the art.

I thought that majoring in choreography would be all shop.  I would create pieces and receive feedback to make them better. Having received my BFA only 5 years prior I don’t know why I didn’t realize that the program would be so well rounded.  I teach non dance majors now as an adjunct professor and explain to many undergraduate students why this dance class they are taking for a fine arts credit helps them become more well rounded. On arriving for my MFA orientation I was reminded that we would be looking at choreography from more than the perspective of the choreographer creating the work.  We looked at it from an audience members point a view, where the work stands in our culture, and what the choreographer’s life entails.  Somatics classes informed me about my body and technique classes gave it new and inspired ways to move. It wasn’t just about spacing, timing and costumes. While few credit hours are spent outside the department (9 out of 60 in our department) you do have the opportunity to explore other fields. I took Global Arts, Multicultural Education and Exercise for Older adults, all of which significantly help me in my jobs today.  I arrived thinking I would only create choreography leave ready to start a company.  I came out with a more open mind about where dance stands in our world.  While creating work on occasion my current bread and butter lies in getting others, college students both in and out of the arts, children at local dance studios, and adults from beginner to professional to expand their knowledge of dance.  Much like the MFA program did for me.

 

B0061P 0098Amanda Diorio is an adjunct faculty member at UNC-Greensboro and Elon University.  She teaches adult classes open to the public at the North Carolina Dance Project where she is also a member of the board of directors.  Amanda holds an M.F.A. in Choreography from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and a B.F.A. in Dance from Temple University. She has taught, produced, and choreographed dance extensively in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Virginia, Florida and North Carolina at universities, studios, public and private schools and community centers. Specializing in Contemporary, Jazz and Hip Hop techniques she enjoys spreading peace, love and understanding through her teaching of dance, choreography and culture.

We want your rejection stories!

Blog

Frame Dance Blog Call for Writers– we want your rejection stories!

SUBMIT HERE.

We are currently seeking submissions for:

Personal and professional stories of rejection (and sometimes triumph!) — from schools, companies, performances, relationships etc.  Walk us through the story and how you came through it.

If you’d like to contribute, please send us your writings or ideas.  Unfortunately, we cannot publish everything.  If you don’t have a rejection story (lucky you!) but are interested in our blog and the columns we run regularly, please let us know. Those topics include:

-MFA and grad school experiences

-health and wellness advice for dancers and non-dancers

-interviews with dancers, dance teachers, and choreographers

Tuesday Tunes

Tuesday Tunes

Performer Profiles!

 

The next Framer up telling us about her performing rituals is…

 

Name: Laura Gutierrezlaura

First Frame Dance : To the Brim (Director’s note: Laura! You were in Quiver first!)

One thing you always do when preparing for a performance: 

It’s important for me to get a good nights sleep, eat a healthy meal and if I don’t make it to a technique class I will definitely go to yoga.

After performance : 

Stretch, eat, shower and I try to make it a point to journal my performance experience. What felt good and how to achieve that feeling again if possible and if something didn’t go as planned how to work on it for the next performance.

Fave moment in performance:

photo by David deHoyos from Frame Dance performing Steve Reich's 2x5 with Liminal Space
photo by David deHoyos from Frame Dance performing Steve Reich’s 2×5 with Liminal Space

I was performing my senior solo in NYC both my sister and niece flew up from Houston to come to the performances. As I was performing my solo (which was about my niece) there was a moment that I looked into the audience and my niece was looking right back at me smiling and reaching towards me. It has happened a few times since where I perform and I make eye contact with family members or friends unplanned its a special feeling seeing those you love supporting you.

 

Thanks Laura!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Links We Like Friday

Free Events Thursday Links We Like Performances/Screenings

Hi All, this is one link we REALLY like.  Save the date: Nov. 8 at 4pm!

Check this out about our upcoming piece, METRO Dances!

“Frame Dance artistic director Lydia Hance has little interest in traditional performance spaces. In fact, her most recent shows have occurred in the back of a truck and Good Dog Houston. She prefers audiences members to bemetrodances_flier scattered among the performers. She’s ready to take it to a new level on Nov. 8 at 4pm with Metro Dances, which begins at Hermann Park/Rice University and ends at the Preston stop for a final performance at Market Square.

Dancing will occur on and off the train, and audiences are free to come and go. Halka, a former winner of Frame Dance Composer’s contest, will provide the mobile score. This will mark his third collaboration with the troupe. Of course, the only ticket involved is a $1.25 MetroRail pass. The show is nicely timed to coincide withMusiqa’s Market Square opening night concert.

metrodances_logoHance describes Metro Dances as a locomotive, mobile and public performance. “MetroRail is a space that people already have an expectation for,” explains Hance. “We know our physical role: buy ticket, wait, board, sit, get off. I want to turn that upside down and make it more exciting. If there are two things that Houston complains about, it is the heat and travel to and from work and leisure. Finding new ways of enjoying transportation opens up the possibility to make anything more exciting. And what could be more crazy than a moving stage? The dancers and musicians are in for as much as a thrill as the audience. You won’t miss us: fearless dancers and percussionists dressed in bright yellow.”

2015 Frame Dance Music Composition Competition

Frame Dance and Composers

framelogo


submit

Frame Dance Productions announces its competition to select a piece of music for its upcoming Spring season. Its two-fold purpose is to offer outstanding emerging composers a forum for their recognition as well as an opportunity to collaborate with the dance performance company, Frame Dance Productions. We are looking for completed pieces, or for samples in consideration for a future work.

Award and Performance
The winning composer’s music will be the basis of a new original work– film and/or live performance, and your music will be exposed to new audiences. The composer and music will be featured prominently as a collaborator with Frame Dance Productions. There are often press opportunities to increase the composer’s visibility as well as the possibility of future commissions. The composer will, in essence, have a fully produced evening centered around his/her work.

Eligibility
All composers, who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents, are eligible.

Submission Guidelines
Works may be written for solo, duo, trio, quartet, or quintet.
Acoustic works that utilize electronic playback are also acceptable.
Electronic music is accepted and encouraged.

*HINT: We’ve been working a lot with percussion lately; we can’t say for sure, but it’s probably not likely we will select a percussion piece this year.

All music must be unpublished.

Interested composers should submit:

• a recording of the piece(s)
• a biography

Entry Fee and Deadline
The entry fee is $15.00. Composers may submit one, two, or three pieces for the single entry fee.

To apply, click “SUBMIT” above.

The deadline is Friday, January 9, 2015.

The winning composition will be announced at FrameDance.org on Friday, January 30, 2015.

For more information on Frame Dance Productions, please visit FrameDance.org.

 

Past Winners

2014 Robert Honstein

2nd Place- Matthew Peterson

3rd Place- Jonathan Russell

Film Score Winner- D. Edward Davis

2013 Robert McClure

2012 Charles Halka

2011 Micah Clark

Tuesday Tunes: Shanon Adams

Tuesday Tunes
Hey, Framers! I’m super excited to be kicking of our dancer profiles with Frame Dance dancer Shanon Adams!
 

Tuesday Tunes: Shanon Adams

 

Shannon AdamsFirst Frame Dance Piece:

Ecouter (Spring 2013)

One thing you always do before a performance:

I always take a shower right before call time before performances. Even if I’m pretty    clean or have just showered recently – it makes me feel refreshed and gives me a sense of  clarity.

What do you do after a performance? How do you unwind? 

Most of the time I like “alone time” after a performance. I need a little time to myself to process everything, sometimes I feel overwhelmed if I’m immediately engaged in conversation. I like to have a glass of wine when I get home and usually another shower.

Describe your favorite moment in a performance:_DSC0647

I have two favorite moments! One is the moment in a performance when I feel focused but am able to give up a lot of my thoughts, get out of my head and just perform “in the moment.”  I always compare it to how it might feel to have an out of body experience. It’s a really beautiful place to be. My other favorite is when I feel a genuine connection with the audience, even if it’s just one person.

 

photos by Edgar Guajardo and Lena Silva.

 

 

MFA Monday: Why I Despise the Word “Passion”

Uncategorized

 MFA rightor Establishing our Own Value

 

by Matthew Cumbie

 

How much is my career worth? How much is my art work worth? When is it ok for me to ask for expect compensation for my services?

 

These are questions that I struggle with almost daily. And I’m willing to wager my small salary that many of you struggle with these same, or similar, questions at various points in your artistic career. Why is that? What is the cause for this dilemma? And when did it become O.K. to divert our attention from addressing these questions by saying, “Oh, you do it because you love it”?

 

Before I go any further, I want to say that I feel very, very fortunate for my current situation and for those experiences and situations that have led me to where I am. I realize that few opportunities to do what I do exist, and to get paid to do those things is sometimes unreal. And I love what I do. But I don’t ever recall this to be a reason that we not pay someone for their work. Returning to our questions above, the reasons could by many: too little funding, it’s a great experience, I don’t have a budget, and many others that we could compile over a few glasses of wine I’m sure. And while these all might be true and very valid, I would like to throw one (or two, depending on how you look at it) more in the mix that I find often unacknowledged: you and me.

 

That’s right. We are sometimes the cause of our own problems, especially in this situation. I say this because we, as performers and makers and teachers, perpetuate this problem of not paying artists when we participate in this cycle. We do it because we have no other option. We do it because we want to be involved in this love affair at whatever the cost. We do it because we know that if we don’t, someone else will…and for free. We do it because we want that, that right there, on our CV. You know, so when we decide that we’re marketable or valuable we’ll have more artistic weight to throw around. And that’s the magic button- we decide.

 

This is where the water gets murky, though.

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